suspectre

descroissants:

"Domestic Solitude", Various Stills of Jeanne’s Apt in Chantal Akerman’s Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles

(via iwanttobelikearollingstone)

brittanyschall:

Beata Chrzanowska Acrylic on canvas  2014

brittanyschall:

Beata Chrzanowska
Acrylic on canvas
2014

(via iwanttobelikearollingstone)

ryanpanos:

Allianz Arena | Hezog & de Meuron | Lars Focke

goatcorporation:

tramampoline:

whatthefuckdidyoulanadelsay:

kingofsaigone:

tinselkin:

aberrantkenosis:

in case you ever wanted to know what mambo number 5 sounds like with all the instruments (including the drums) replaced with bike horns 

it sounds like the song is going to kill you and it’s perfect

image

i smiled through the whole thing because i just don’t understand what would compell someone to do this but thanks

i played this on the radio once like actual radio

the champagne of mambo no. 5 midis

In fairy tales, monsters exist to be a manifestation of something that we need to understand, not only a problem we need to overcome, but also they need to represent, much like angels represent the beautiful, pure, eternal side of the human spirit, monsters need to represent a more tangible, more mortal side of being human: aging, decay, darkness and so forth. And I believe that monsters originally, when we were cavemen and you know, sitting around a fire, we needed to explain the birth of the sun and the death of the moon and the phases of the moon and rain and thunder. And we invented creatures that made sense of the world: a serpent that ate the sun, a creature that ate the moon, a man in the moon living there, things like that. And as we became more and more sophisticated and created sort of a social structure, the real enigmas started not to be outside. The rain and the thunder were logical now. But the real enigmas became social. All those impulses that we were repressing: cannibalism, murder, these things needed an explanation. The sex drive, the need to hunt, the need to kill, these things then became personified in monsters. Werewolves, vampires, ogres, this and that. I feel that monsters are here in our world to help us understand it. They are an essential part of a fable.

—Guillermo Del Toro (via sovietcop)

(Source: iwearthecheeseyo, via agooduniverse)

cressus:

     No one before Bernini had managed to make marble so carnal. In his nimble hands it would flatter and stream, quiver and sweat. His figures weep and shout, their torses twist and run, and arch themselves in spasms of intense sensation. He could, like an alchemist, change one material into another - marble into trees, leaves, hair, and, of course, flesh.  
     -   Simon Schama’s Power of Art. Bernini

(via agooduniverse)

saloandseverine:

Ohayô (Good Morning, Yasujirô Ozu, 1959

saloandseverine:

Ohayô (Good Morning, Yasujirô Ozu, 1959

(via darkartsandcrafts)

Three Films by Hiroshi Teshigahara
Pitfall — Woman in the Dunes — The Face of Another

(Source: strangewood, via moravagine)

a-bittersweet-life:

I try to mimic the pattern of memory and of thinking and the randomness of life. It’s like a journey. That is the main thing about the beauty of life; that you don’t cram. And not only beauty, but also the fact that there is never a concrete thing in life. I want the movie to be a tool of liberation…Liberation from expectation, liberation from the known pattern of time presented in film. It is playful. It’s what keeps me making the films, because I enjoy this play.
Apichatpong Weerasethakul

a-bittersweet-life:

I try to mimic the pattern of memory and of thinking and the randomness of life. It’s like a journey. That is the main thing about the beauty of life; that you don’t cram. And not only beauty, but also the fact that there is never a concrete thing in life. I want the movie to be a tool of liberation…Liberation from expectation, liberation from the known pattern of time presented in film. It is playful. It’s what keeps me making the films, because I enjoy this play.

Apichatpong Weerasethakul